FTC Identity Theft Victim's Complaint and Affidavit
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FTC Identity Theft Victim's Complaint and Affidavit

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Video instructions and help with filling out and completing FTC Identity Theft Victim's Complaint and Affidavit

Instructions and Help about FTC Identity Theft Victim's Complaint and Affidavit

You can help limit the damage from identity theft with some quick responses placing a fraud alert on your credit reports filing a complaint with the FTC and then filing a police report taking these steps will give you some important tools to deal with other problems that may come up like charges you didn't authorize on your credit card phone or utility bills like ATM withdrawals or debit card purchases you didn't approve like getting a letter from the IRS saying someone has filed for a tax refund in your name keep records of your calls and copies of documents if these problems do come up later you'll have the necessary tools close at hand for more tips and tools on dealing with identity theft visit ftc.gov/idtheft that's ftc.gov/idtheft

FAQ

How do you find out if you have credit or debit cards that are being used by someone else and that you are a victim of identity theft?
Everyone is entitled to a free credit score per year.   So, make sure you take time every year to obtain your scores from the three big credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian and Transusion.   How to Check Your Credit Score has instructions on how obtain the reports   With your credit report, you can see all open lines of credit and identify anomalies.   If anything is fishy, you can contact the credit bank, credit bureau, etc to get more information or dispute.  While you can get your reports more than once a year, but you will have to pay for them.For more protection, you can sign up for a credit monitoring service.  Most are paid subscriptions, but some offer free services with an option to upgrade.  As an example, the password manager Lastpass also offers a free credit monitoring service.   It will alert you every time there is a credit check, although you need to subscribe to the paid version to get more information.   I would highly suggest reading through this article: Are Credit Monitoring Services Worth It? for more information, tips and advice.
How can a person rent a room/apartment without going through a background check (what if someone is an identity theft victim for example and is leery to shell out information)?
Turn this around for another way of looking at it.“How can a landlord rent a room/apartment without going through a background check to determine that the applicant can afford the rental, and has no history of cheating on rent or damage to another landlord’s rental property?”There tend to be more deadbeat tenants than skeezy landlords, IMO.A tenant can help this by obtaining their own credit report and removing account numbers and/or Social Security ID #s - . At that point, landlord is only looking for info on criminal records, landlord referrals - past addresses need to be provided, but that shouldn’t create an identity theft issue.
I found out someone is using some else's SSN. How can I find the name and contact the person and let them know they are a victim of identity theft?
You can contact the FBI with that information or you could call the Social Security Administration or the State Labor Department. They can handle it without giving you confidential information you are not entitled to. The Internal Revenue Service is another possibility. They will give you a 10% finder’s fee for any tax money they pick up.
I found out that someone is using someone else's social security number. How do I find the real owner and let them know they are a victim of identity theft?
I would start here:Office of the Inspector General, SSARather than you finding the real owner, let the SSA do it.
Identity theft: How dangerous is it to toss out old catalogs and other junk mail without obliterating my name and address from them?
It's extremely dangerous for anyone to know your name and address as nothing would prevent such a person from knocking on your door and then saying your name, combined with some form of greeting, when you opened the door.  Even if you wisely choose never to open your door, such a person could say your name while you were on the other side of that door, in a foyer perhaps, which you would be forced to hear.  This person could just say your name outloud anywhere, in a bar or a Starbucks, and act like he or she knew you, and if anyone says otherwise, respond, "well then how do I know his home address?"
How hard is it to get a new Social Security number if I have been a victim of identity theft for three years and the criminals still are on the loose?
I'm sorry you had to experience this, Identity theft is first and foremost a legal issue.  I am curious to know what have you tried to address the situation with the theft of your social security?  I am not an attorney and can not provide legal advice, what I would like to do is educate people and share information on a service that I think is the best in the world  at what they do. IDShield, a division of LegalShield, continues that mission by providing identity protection to more than a million people in 50 states and four Canadian provinces. No other company combines the expertise of the most knowledgeable identity protection specialists in the industry with an exclusive partnership with Kroll, the worldwide leader in theft investigation services. 24/7, 365 days a year, our team of dedicated individuals does whatever it takes, for as long as it takes, to keep you and your family safe: http:// www.legalshield.com/hub/...
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